News

Press Release

Kentucky United We Stand, Divided We Fall

Commonwealth of Kentucky
Cabinet for Health and Family Services

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Barbara Fox
502-564-6786, ext. 3102

Beth Fisher
502-564-6786, ext.3101

Colder Temperatures Increase the Risk for Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

FRANKFORT, Ky. - As temperatures drop and the risk for carbon monoxide poisoning increases, Kentuckians are urged to be aware of the dangers of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning due to improper use of heating or cooking devices.

Items such as kerosene or propane gas stoves and ovens have been used as alternative heat sources indoors, sometimes with tragic results. Since these devices emit a colorless, odorless gas called carbon monoxide as a by-product, improper use can lead to severe cases of carbon monoxide poisoning. The Kentucky Department for Public Health (DPH), which is part of the Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS) advises Kentuckians to follow these steps taken from guidelines issued by the National Center for Environmental Health to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning:

  • Don’t use a generator, charcoal grill, camp stove or other gasoline or charcoal-burning device inside your home, basement or garage or outside near a window.
  • Don’t run a car or truck inside a garage attached to your house, even if you leave the door open.
  • Don’t use a fireplace that isn’t properly vented.
  • Don’t heat your house with a gas oven.
  • Be sure to carefully follow manufacturers’ instructions for kerosene heaters, making sure the wick is set at the proper level and is clean. Ensure your kerosene heater is only operated in a well-vented area. Kerosene heaters require 1-K grade kerosene fuel and fuel should be clear, not colored or cloudy. To avoid the risk of fire, place kerosene heaters several feet away from all furniture, curtains, paper, clothes, bedding and other combustible materials. Infants, small children and pets should be kept away from heaters to avoid serious burns.
  • Seek immediate medical attention if you suspect carbon monoxide poisoning and are experiencing symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning. Early symptoms include headache, nausea, vomiting and fatigue. Carbon monoxide poisoning is treatable.
  • Install a battery-operated carbon monoxide detector in your home and replace the battery when you change the time on your clocks each spring and fall for daylight savings time. If the detector sounds, leave your home immediately and call 911. On average, carbon monoxide detectors should be replaced about every five years.

"Carbon monoxide is a colorless and odorless gas that can be deadly and should be taken seriously,” said Hiram C. Polk, Jr. M.D., commissioner, Kentucky Department for Public Health (DPH). "We urge Kentuckians to take steps to prevent exposure to carbon monoxide such as allowing adequate ventilation to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning and avoiding fire hazards.”

If you are experiencing symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning, call 911 or contact the Poison Control hot line at (800) 222-1222.

More information about carbon monoxide poisoning can be found on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Web site at http://www.cdc.gov/co/guidelines.htm.

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The Cabinet for Health and Family Services is home to most of the state's human services and healthcare programs, including the Department for Medicaid Services, the Department for Community Based Services the Department for Public Health and the Department for Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities. CHFS is one of the largest agencies in state government, with nearly 8,000 full- and part-time employees located across the Commonwealth focused on improving the lives and health of Kentuckians.

Press Release

Kentucky United We Stand, Divided We Fall

Commonwealth of Kentucky
Cabinet for Health and Family Services

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Barbara Fox
502-564-6786, ext. 3102

Beth Fisher
502-564-6786, ext.3101

Flu Level Raised to Widespread in Kentucky

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 12, 2017) - The Kentucky Department for Public Health (DPH), within the Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS) is raising the influenza (flu) level in the state from "regional” to "widespread.” Widespread activity is the highest level of flu activity, which indicates increased flu-like activity or flu outbreaks in at least half of the regions in the state.

"With widespread flu activity reported in Kentucky, now is a good time to protect yourself and your family by getting a flu shot”, said Hiram C. Polk, Jr., M.D., commissioner of DPH. "We urge anyone who hasn’t received a flu vaccine, particularly those at high risk for complications related to the flu, to check with local health departments or other providers.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends flu vaccine for all individuals six months of age and older. However, the nasal spray flu vaccine should not be used because it has been shown to be ineffective. People who are strongly encouraged to receive the flu vaccine because they may be at higher risk for complications or negative consequences include:

  • Children age six months through 59 months; 
  • Women who are or will be pregnant during the influenza season; 
  • Persons 50 years of age or older;
  • Persons with extreme obesity (Body Mass Index of 40 or greater); 
  • Persons aged six months and older with chronic health problems; 
  • Residents of nursing homes and other long-term care facilities;
  •  Household contacts (including children) and caregivers of children aged ≤59 months (i.e., aged
  • Household contacts and caregivers or people who live with a person at high-risk for complications from the flu; and
  • Health care workers, including physicians, nurses, and other workers in inpatient and outpatient-care settings, medical emergency-response workers (e.g., paramedics and emergency medical technicians), employees of nursing home and long-term care facilities who have contact with patients or residents, and students in these professions who will have contact with patients.

Adequate supplies of flu vaccine are available for this year’s season. Vaccinations can be given any time during the flu season. The flu activity level is tracked weekly as part of the CDC national flu surveillance system.

"You should also follow the advice your parents gave you to prevent flu and other illnesses that tend to circulate at this time of year – wash your hands frequently, cover your mouth when you cough or sneeze and stay home when you’re sick," concluded CHFS Secretary Vickie Yates Brown Gilsson.

Infection with the flu virus can cause fever, headache, cough, sore throat, runny nose, sneezing and body aches. Flu can be very contagious. For more information on influenza or the availability of flu vaccine, please contact your local health department or visit http://healthalerts.ky.gov.

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The Cabinet for Health and Family Services is home to most of the state's human services and healthcare programs, including the Department for Medicaid Services, the Department for Community Based Services the Department for Public Health and the Department for Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities. CHFS is one of the largest agencies in state government, with nearly 8,000 full- and part-time employees located across the Commonwealth focused on improving the lives and health of Kentuckians.

Are you Ready to Stop Smoking?

Sign up for Freedom From Smoking

The American Lung Association's Freedom from Smoking program gives you options, resources, and support to quit for good!  Freedom from Smoking is the premier smoking cessation program from the American Lung Association.  It helps you develop a plan of action that leads to your quit day.  You will also receive the support you need to remain smokefree for life.

                     What You'll Learn

  • How to know if you're really ready to quit
  • Medications that an increase your success
  • Lifestyle changes to make quitting easier
  • How to prepare for your quit day
  • Coping strategies for managing stress and avoiding weight gain
  • Developing a new self-image
  • How to stay smokefree for good

IMPROVE YOUR HEALTH & THE HEALTH OF THOSE AROUND YOU

The Rewards of Becoming a Nonsmoker are GREAT........

After 20 minutes:

  • Blood pressure drops.
  • Pulse rate drops.
  • Temperature of hand and feet increase to normal

After 24 hours:

  • Ability to smell and taste is enhanced.
  • Chance of heart attack decreases.

After 1 year:

  • Risk of heart disease is cut in half.

After 5 years:

  • Risk of dying from lung cancer is half that of a person who continues to smoke.

Upcoming Class Dates:

Tuesdays, March 14th-May 2nd
Time: 6pm-7:30pm
Location: Home Health Agency
273 Shoppers Drive
Winchester, KY 40391 
 
 

To register contact Carolyn Burtner at (859)744-4482 Ext. 1036 or email her at carolynm.burtner@ky.gov

 

 

 

 

  

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and the HPV Vaccine

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended routine vaccination for girls 11-12 years of age. The ACIP recommendation also allows for vaccination of girls beginning at nine years old as well as vaccination of girls and women 13-26 years old.

Babies were born to be breastfed!

Infants fed human milk receive multiple health benefits. Breastfeeding also supports multiple nutritional, environmental and economic benefits compared to formula fed infants. Human milk helps infants grow and mature properly, especially in the first year of life when the brain doubles in size. Human milk has over 200 constituents, most not duplicated in formula, and provides immunological protection against a variety of illnesses.

KY's Tobacco Quit Line --Need Help to Stop Smoking? Use this FREE Effective Resource

The quit line is a free, statewide, telephone-based tobacco cessation resource. The quit line provides information to tobacco users and non-tobacco users on tobacco dependence and its treatment, thedangers of secondhand smoke, and other tobacco-related information. Information may include advice for family and friends on helping a tobacco user quit, and support for a quit attempt.

Volunteer for Medical Reserve Corps

Do you want to volunteer and be of service to your community during times of need or disaster? Consider applying to volunteer with the Medical Reserve Corps. The Clark County Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) is a part of the Clark County Health Department. MRC volunteers are properly trained to help out during emergencies, disasters, and public health practice initiatives.